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   The original phase of construction was completed in 1924. This first phase included the east and west stands, which seated about 12,000. Seven years later (1931), the sides were extended upward to accommodate an additional 10,000 fans, raising the capacity to 22,000. In 1936, the stadium seating capacity was increased to 46,000, with the addition of 24,000 seats in the north end, making Tiger Stadium into a horseshoe configuration.

The next phase of construction took place in 1953 when the stadium's south end was closed to turn the horseshoe into a bowl, increasing the seating capacity to 67,720. The original upper deck atop the west stands was completed in 1978, and it added 8,000 seats to the stadium's capacity. Additional seating in two club level sections, which flanked the existing press box, brought the total addition to approximately 10,000 seats and raised the stadium's capacity to approximately 78,000.

The playing field was moved 11 feet south in 1986 to provide more room between the back line of the North End Zone and the curvature of the stadium fence, which surrounds the field. It also put the playing area in the exact center of the arena's grassy surface.

Now one of the largest on-campus stadiums in college football, Tiger Stadium continues to provide fans with the ultimate college football experience. When 11,600 seats were added to the east upper deck in 2000, capacity reached nearly 92,000. In addition to the new east upper deck, 70 skyboxes, called "Tiger Dens:' were built, giving Tiger fans luxury accommodations. The addition of the 11,600 seats in 2000 marked the first expansion to Tiger Stadium since 1978, when the original west upper deck was completed.

 

The distinctive environment of Tiger Stadium became even more pronounced in 2005 as The ambitious West Upper Deck project was virtually completed. Construction on the project which began immediately after LSU's home finale against Ole Miss in November of 2004- - carried a $60 million price tag and rebuilt over 3,200 special amenity seats as a well as a state of-the-art press box to Tiger Stadium. The west side renovation, which included the removal and rebuilding of the upper deck to mirror the east side upper deck, was finished during the 2006 season.

In 2009, major technological advances were made when Tiger Stadium added an 80-foot wide high -definition video board to the north end zone of the facility. Called one of the largest video boards in all of college athletics, the HD board measures 27-feet high and 80-feet wide.

In August 2010, LSU Vice Chancellor and Director of Athletics Joe Alleva and the Tiger Athletic Foundation launched a campaign to preserve and restore the look of Tiger Stadium. This project included the replacement of over 400 windows on the north side of the Stadium and brand new North and West Plazas. The latest announcement is the South End Zone Addition that will once again increase the seating capacity of Tiger Stadium, keeping the Stadium among the largest on-campus college stadiums.

This stunning photograph is the inauguration of Earl K. Long in 1956. Earl had invited everyone to come out and have burgers and drinks and lots of folks came.

 

 
  The original phase of construction was completed in 1924. This first phase included the east and west stands, which seated about 12,000. Seven years later (1931), the sides were extended upward to accommodate an additional 10,000 fans, raising the capacity to 22,000. In 1936, the stadium seating capacity was increased to 46,000, with the addition of 24,000 seats in the north end, making Tiger Stadium into a horseshoe configuration.

The next phase of construction took place in 1953 when the stadium's south end was closed to turn the horseshoe into a bowl, increasing the seating capacity to 67,720. The original upper deck atop the west stands was completed in 1978, and it added 8,000 seats to the stadium's capacity. Additional seating in two club level sections, which flanked the existing press box, brought the total addition to approximately 10,000 seats and raised the stadium's capacity to approximately 78,000.

The playing field was moved 11 feet south in 1986 to provide more room between the back line of the North End Zone and the curvature of the stadium fence, which surrounds the field. It also put the playing area in the exact center of the arena's grassy surface.

Now one of the largest on-campus stadiums in college football, Tiger Stadium continues to provide fans with the ultimate college football experience. When 11,600 seats were added to the east upper deck in 2000, capacity reached nearly 92,000. In addition to the new east upper deck, 70 skyboxes, called "Tiger Dens:' were built, giving Tiger fans luxury accommodations. The addition of the 11,600 seats in 2000 marked the first expansion to Tiger Stadium since 1978, when the original west upper deck was completed.

 

The distinctive environment of Tiger Stadium became even more pronounced in 2005 as The ambitious West Upper Deck project was virtually completed. Construction on the project which began immediately after LSU's home finale against Ole Miss in November of 2004- - carried a $60 million price tag and rebuilt over 3,200 special amenity seats as a well as a state of-the-art press box to Tiger Stadium. The west side renovation, which included the removal and rebuilding of the upper deck to mirror the east side upper deck, was finished during the 2006 season.

In 2009, major technological advances were made when Tiger Stadium added an 80-foot wide high -definition video board to the north end zone of the facility. Called one of the largest video boards in all of college athletics, the HD board measures 27-feet high and 80-feet wide.

In August 2010, LSU Vice Chancellor and Director of Athletics Joe Alleva and the Tiger Athletic Foundation launched a campaign to preserve and restore the look of Tiger Stadium. This project included the replacement of over 400 windows on the north side of the Stadium and brand new North and West Plazas. The latest announcement is the South End Zone Addition that will once again increase the seating capacity of Tiger Stadium, keeping the Stadium among the largest on-campus college stadiums.

This Football game is in Tiger Stadium with unknown opponent and date.

 

 
 
 
The name "tigers" was used for nearly half a century before a live tiger was brought to LSU. For more than a decade, a paper-mache tiger was used as the mascot of the Ole War Skule in 1924. One of LSU's graduates donated a small, black South American cat; it was probably much like a bobcat or a jaguar with a short tail. LSU fans called him "Little eat em Up”. LSU lost all of its conference games that year, so "Little eat em Up" was sent away.

On November 21, 1936, the first "Mike the Tiger" live tiger was brought to LSU. Students staged a protest that classes be cancelled in honor of Mike's arrival! Mike is named after long time trainer Mike Chambers.This original cage was only 400 square feet. In 1981 a new cage was expanded to 2,000 square feet. The current habitat is over 15.000 square feet and is one of

 
 
 
The John M. Parker Agricultural Coliseum, home to some of the LSU Ag Center's livestock shows, rodeos and other activities on the LSU campus, is one of the largest of its kind. The coliseum was named for the then Governor John M. Parker.

Oval and constructed of brick, hollow tile, concrete and structural steel, the building is 360 feet long and 220 feet wide. It was constructed during a $10,000,000 building program at the Louisiana State University between 1930 and 1938. The original cost was $1,338,871 and it was completed in 1937. The roof is of sheet copper and dome-shaped. It has an arena 250 feet long and 125 feet wide, which is surrounded by a reinforced concrete amphitheater that provides individual seats for 6,756 people. At the time of its construction it was six feet larger than Madison Square Garden, which made it the largest coliseum in the United States.

The building also provides space for laboratories and offices of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Louisiana Agricultural Experiment Station and World Aquaculture Society.

For many years, the building provided a place for the LSU Tigers basketball team to play. A wooden floor was assembled and laid on top of the dirt. This was the home of the legendary "Pistol Pete" Maravich college basketball's all-time leading scorer!

 
 
 
Also known as the Campanile or campanelle, Italian for "little bells”, this 175-foot structure was built in 1923 and dedicated in 1926 as a memorial to Louisianans who died in WWI.On the rotunda walls are bronze plaques bearing the names of those to whom the Tower is dedicated. The Memorial Tower also houses the permanent collections of the LSU Museum of Art. Chimes ring every quarter hour.

The Cornerstone in front of the tower was excavated from the ruins of Louisiana State Seminary of Learning and Military Academy in Pineville (early LSU) one half describes the history, other half is inscribed with first Board of Supervisors and faculty.


The LSU War Memorial which sits in front of the memorial tower on the parade grounds was dedicated on Oct. 8, 1998, in memory of those who gave their lives in military conflicts from WWII through the present. The LSU Alumni Association raised the money necessary to construct the memorial and then donated it to the university.

When a rare snowfall blanketed Baton Rouge in 1940, Fonville couldn't resist documenting this beautiful sight.

 
 

 

Influenced by the military band at West Point and those evolving at other major universities, LSU got its own musical organization in 1893, thanks to Wylie M. Barrow and Ruffin G. Pleasant. Barrow was named captain of the new group and Pleasant, a future governor of the state, served as director of that first eleven - piece band When Louisiana's famous populist Governor Huey P. Long took a personal interest in the band in the early 1930s, major changes began to take place that set the band on a unique course toward national prominence. Long's plan was to make LSU one of the country's greatest universities. This included making the band second to none. In addition to importing Castro Carazo (shown on left - orchestra leader at the Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans), as the new bandmaster in 1934, Long supervised many aspects of the band's image and life. He saw to it that the football band traded in its military dress for a showier stadium look. It was Long who introduced the LSU band to its current colors - purple and gold

 

 
 Built in 1937-1938 under the works Progress Administration. Home of the LSU Tigers
baseball team. Winners of the National Championship in 1991, '93, '96, '97 and 2000!

Named after, World War II hero, Simeon Alex Box from Quitman, Mississippi. He began his
college education in 1938. He came to LSU on a football scholarship. He played wingback his
sophomore year but dislocated his shoulder in a 1939 game against Holy Cross. Undeterred,
Box turned to baseball and was a letterman on the 1940 and 1942 teams.

With America's entry into WWII, Second Lt. Box became a combat engineer. He was awarded
the Distinguished Service Cross, the Army's second highest decoration for heroism when in


Nov. '42 he single-handily destroyed six enemy machine gun nests with hand grenades.
Sadly in Feb. '43 Alex was killed in a mine explosion. His body is buried in North Africa. In
spring of 1943 the LSU board of supervisors voted to name the schools baseball facility Alex
Box Stadium. The stadium is recognized for both its old-fashioned charm and its modern
renovations.

A new Alex Box stadium was completed for the 2009 season. The "Box" was torn down and
made room for a parking lot. For more information on Alex Box and how to contribute to the
new "Box" go to
www.makeyourpitch.net.

 

 
 
 
The Huey P. Long Fieldhouse, completed in 1932, is one of the original buildings on the LSU
Campus. Built under Long's leadership, the fieldhouse was the original student union, with a
ballroom, soda fountain, post office, beauty parlor, barber shop, and outdoor swinuning pooL It is
the only building in Baton Rouge that bears the name of Huey P. Long, governor and U.S. Senator.

This aquatic facility often described as having the appearance of a "Roman Bath;' was from its
inception not only beautiful in architectural details, but was built to be the longest pool in the
country per Long's dream to build the best university in the U.S. The fieldhouse was designed by
the same firm that built the Old State Capital and Governors Mansion. The buildings are also on
the State Registry and National Registry "because it embodies distinctive characteristics of a type of
period, and method of construction that represents the work of a master and possesses high artistic
value:' (State Registry)


From the pool's completion until the 1970's, the HPL pool hosted many swim lessons for students
of all ages and it was required that every LSU student complete a swim class during their tenure

at the University. In 1988 the Men's Swim team, which trained at the HPL pool, won the SEC
championship. But since the
1960s
the Huey P. Long pool began a steady decline. Due to lack of
regular maintenance and upkeep the pool was drained and finally closed around 1999.

What once was a thriving center for social gatherings, athleticism, and charitable opportunity, now
lies empty with not a drop of its original vision remaining. An effort has been established by the
Foundation for Historical Louisiana to save the structure.

 

 
 
 

Also known as the Campanile or campanelle, Italian for "little bells”, this 175-foot structure was built in 1923 and dedicated in 1926 as a memorial to Louisianans who died in WWI. On the rotunda walls are bronze plaques bearing the names of those to whom the Tower is dedicated. The Memorial Tower also houses the permanent collections of the LSU Museum of Art. Chimes ring every quarter hour.

The Cornerstone in front of the tower was excavated from the ruins of Louisiana State Seminary of Learning and Military Academy in Pineville (early LSU) one half describes the history, other half is inscribed with first Board of Supervisors and faculty.

The LSU War Memorial which sits in front of the memorial tower on the parade grounds was dedicated on Oct. 8, 1998, in memory of those who gave their lives in military conflicts from WWII through the present. The LSU Alumni Association raised the money necessary to construct the memorial and then donated it to the university.

When a rare snowfall blanketed Baton Rouge in 1940, Fonville couldn't resist documenting this beautiful sight.

 

 

 
 
 
The Gates as they are referred to were constructed with the original campus which was dedicated in 1926. They serve as an official entrance to the beautiful LSU campus. There is a South Gate on the southern side of the campus on Highland

Road as well as a North Gate at the entrance to the campus on Nicholson Drive. This is one of the two gates on Highland Road.

 

 
 
 

The LSU Law School opened September 24, 1906 with 26 full-time law students and one faculty member, Joseph Kelly, who also served as dean.Classes were held in Hill Memorial Library on the old downtown campus of LSU, which was at the present site of the state capitol grounds. In 1925, the law school followed the University to the present campus and was housed in Thomas Boyd Hall before moving to its current site on Highland Road.
Leon Weiss designed the building in the style of the U.S. Supreme Court and, in late 1937, Dean Paul M. Hebert and his students moved in.

The building was later named after Governor Richard Leche.  Leche and LSU president James Monroe Smith went to prison after a series of events that became known as the "Louisiana Scandals:' Leche resigned as Governor in 1939, and Earl K. Long was sworn in. He was sentenced to 10 years in prison (and served three and one-half years.) After his conviction, the university removed his name from the building. Pardoned in 1953 by President Harry Truman, Leche resumed his law practice in New Orleans until his death in 1965.


The LSU board of supervisors subsequently adopted a rule that no university building could be named for a person that has not been deceased for at least two years. The building became known simply as the Law
Building. Later it would be named after Paul M. Herbert, the former dean of the Law School.

October 2003 marked the completion of major renovations to the Law Center campus, which resulted in an expanded, thoroughly modern complex that includes state-of-the-art technology and a Law Library that
holds one of the richest comparative law collections in the nation.

Throughout its long history of academic excellence reflecting Louisiana's rich legal heritage, the LSU Law Center has maintained a strong reputation for legal education that is both demanding and rewarding.

 
 
 

The original phase of construction was completed in 1924. This first phase included the east and west stands, which seated about 12,000. Seven years later (1931), the sides were extended upward to accommodate an additional 1 0,000 fans, raising the capacity to 22,000. In 1936, the stadium seating capacity was increased to 46,000, with the addition of 24,000 seats in the north end, making Tiger Stadium into a horseshoe configuration.

The next phase of construction took place in 1953 when the stadium's south end was closed to turn the horseshoe into a bowl, increasing the seating capacity to 67,720.

The original upper deck atop the west stands was completed in 1978, and it added 8,000 seats to the stadium's capacity. Additional seating in two club level sections, which flanked the existing press box, brought the total addition to approximately 10,000 seats and raised the stadiums capacity to approximately 78,000.

The playing field was moved 11 feet south in 1986 to provide more room between the back line of the North End Zone and the curvature of the stadium fence, which surrounds the field. It also put the playing area in the exact center of the arena's grassy surface.

Now one of the largest on-campus stadiums in college football, Tiger Stadium continues to provide fans with the ultimate college football experience. When 11,600 seats were added to the east upper deck in 2000, capacity reached nearly 92,000. In addition to the new east upper deck, 70 skyboxes, called "Tiger Dens;' were built, giving Tiger fans luxury accommodations. The addition of the 11,600 seats in 2000 marked the first expansion to Tiger Stadium since 1978, when the original west upper deck was completed.

The distinctive environment of Tiger Stadium became even more pronounced in 2005 as the ambitious West Upper Deck project was virtually completed. Construction on the project - which began immediately after LSD's home finale against Ole Miss in November of 2004 - carried a $60 million price tag and rebuilt over 3,200 special amenity seats as a well as a state-of-the-art press box to Tiger Stadium. The west side renovation, which included the removal and rebuilding of the upper deck to mirror the east side upper deck, was finished during the 2006 season.

In 2009, major technological advances were made when Tiger Stadium added an 80-foot wide high -definition video board to the north end zone of the facility Called one of the largest video boards in all of college athletics, the HD board measures 27 -feet high and 80-feet wide.

 

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